Mar 162011
 

If you pick a hamster cage made of plastic and wire it will usually have a colorful plastic top, wire bars in the middle, and a plastic base on the bottom. When you are choosing this type of cage you should think about size, set up, color, parts, and cost.

Size

Generally the plastic and wire combination cage is a little smaller than a plain wire cage. Many of these type hamster habitats are usually under 2 feet in length. Some of these cages allow you to make them bigger because they have holes on the top or the side. These holes let you connect hamster tubes that can expand the cage. You can add a lot of tubes or you can bring the tubes to second cage so your hamster can run between the cages. hamster cage

Some of these cages also let you add a second story so your hamster has an extra floor in the cage to play on.

If you’re keeping a couple of dwarf hamsters, this type cage might be good for you. But if you have one large Teddy Bear or Syrian hamster, look it over carefully to be sure he or she is going to have enough room to move around.

As with all hamster cages, you need to be sure the wire bars are close enough to keep a dwarf hamster, such as such as a Roborovski, from escaping through the bars.

Set up

These cages usually come in a box with a lot of pieces that have to be put together. So setting up this type of cage means snapping the wire parts into the plastic base, putting the plastic parts in the cage, then attaching the top and any other plastic pieces that attach to the sides or the top. This can be a big job and smaller kids may need help. hamster cage

People disagree on how easy or hard it is to put these cages together. Some people find it easy to get together while others think they are very difficult.

One problem is the plastic used for the tubing on the tops of this cage. If the plastic is thin or flimsy and you push things too hard when putting the cage together, the plastic can break. You have to be especially careful when you’re squeezing plastic climbing tubes into their holes.

One of the additional problems is that the instructions that come with these cages are often not too good. So you have to try and put the cage together by looking at the picture on the box.

One good piece of advice is to put the cage together before you buy your new hamster. That way you have plenty of time and don’t have to worry about your hamster being stuck inside an exercise ball.

Color

Although these cages are colorful to look at, keep in mind that hamsters are colorblind so they can’t see the colors. They can, however, see light and dark. So the lighter color plastic will be easier for them to see through while it will be harder for them to see through the darker colors. It will also be easier for you to see your hamster inside the cage if you get a lighter color plastic. But, to tell the truth, you don’t get to choose the colors you want for most of these cages.

Pieces and parts

Combination plastic and metal cages usually come in kits that have a lot of pieces. Because hamsters are all different, not all the pieces will be the right sizes for all hamsters. Sometimes the exercise wheels are too small for Syrian hamsters. Sometimes the water bottles leak or don’t fit well inside the cage. Sometimes the food bowls can be too tiny for all the different kinds of food you want to give your hamster.

So even if you think you’re saving money by buying a kit with all the parts, you may find you still have to buy a separate exercise wheel or a separate water bottle to fit inside these cages. These will cost extra. hamster cage

You also want to be sure that hamster tubes that are part of this cage are big enough for your regular size hamster, like a Teddy Bear, to get through. You don’t want your hamster getting stuck in the tubes. If you have dwarf hamsters, you also want to be sure the hamsters have something to grab on to so they can climb through the tubes. If the tubes are smooth you may want to put a thin branch inside the tube so your hamster can more easily climb through it.

Cost

These cages vary in cost depending on size. The taller combination cages – like three stories – usually cost around $50 and up. Medium-size cages that are one and two-stories often cost from about $25-$40. Smaller, starter cages can be found for about $25-$35. There are a few very small combination cages available for under $20. To see different cages and their costs go to the hamster cages and accessories page.

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Feb 192011
 

I’ve looked through YouTube and picked out some of the best hamster videos that show off how people use their hamster tubes. None of these are the simple kind that fit inside a hamster cage. These are the tube set ups that GO CRAZY!

Just remember, if you want to go this route you better have plenty of time to put the tubes together and even more time to take them apart and clean them.

5 CRAzIeST Hamster Cages on YouTube! Tube Overload!

Five different ways to connect tubes to cages. The last one is a collection of still picture showing how the tubes were put together. The person who shot this video also gives you a little description of how it was done with lnks to a basic cage and the tubes. You can see the same cages and tubes on the hamster cages and accessories page.

Time: 1:49

The following are three videos all by the same person: Part 1, 2, and 3.

They are all slide shows showing still pictures of different hamster cages with tubes. FUN MUSIC plays in the background!

Crazy Hamster Cages, Part 1!

Time: 1:16

Crazy Hamster Cages, Part 2!

Also features cats closely observing the cages. Poor frightened roborovski!

Time: about 3 minutes

Crazy Hamster Cages, Part 3!

More music and photos.

Time: 2:18

Tube overload!

A quickie video. Shows the set up for two dwarf hamsters. The tubes go up down and around for one cage.

Time: 41 seconds

Hamster City Part 1

A short video showing lots of tubes that go straight up in the air. Some tough climbing, especially for dwarf hamsters.

Time: 51 seconds

The Evolution of Ham-Tropolis

Still pictures showing how one cage with tubes started and then just grew and grew!

Music used is the Hamster Dance song.

I think taking apart, cleaning, and putting back together this set up would take about a day.

Time: 1:18


Now go make your own hamster tube set up! hamster tubes

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Feb 162011
 

Hamster tubes, those round, colorful, plastic parts, can provide your hamster with great fun and exercise. As part of your hamster cage , you can put together climbing tubes, compartments, and other segments, in many different ways. They can go horizontally, straight up, around curves, and even loop-d-loops. How you arrange them is up to what parts fit together and your own imagination.

But here’s a few things to think about before you start buying assorted tube sets.

Size

Hamsters come in different sizes and so do tubes. hamster tubes

The typical tubes you see advertised will usually work for Syrian hamsters, Teddy Bear, or Golden hamsters . Chinese and Campbell Dwarf hamsters are also usually good climbers. Dwarf hamsters, however, such as Roboravskis may find it harder to climb the tubes. Make sure your buy the tubes with ridges so their feet have something to hold on to.

But even with Syrians or Goldens, if they start to get too fat or get pregnant, they can get stuck in a tube, or “fun nel” as some manufacturers call it. They might even get stuck if they keep too much food in their pouches. If a hamster gets stuck in a tube, you may have to break the tube to get him or her out. So even if the tube size is right when you bought it, keep checking to make sure your hamster can still get through.

Safety

Although your hammy can have lots of fun running through his or her tube, your biggest concern is for your hamster’s safety.

Think about ventilation when buying your tubes. You want to be sure your hamster has plenty of air circulating while it’s in the tubes. Look for tubes that have small air holes. That way, you know some air is getting inside the tubes. (And these holes can help dwarf hamsters climb through the tubes.) If the tubes don’t have holes, and you connect a long row of tubes, there will be less air in the middle – where your hamster might decide to take a rest.

Ease of use hamster tubes

One of the real issues with hamster tubes is how easy, or difficult, they are to put together. Some people claim to have no problem snapping them together. But in many online reviews, people talk about how difficult it is to get two pieces of tube together. And some people have a bigger problem when attaching a tube piece to a hole in the hamster cage.

  • Read the directions. Sometimes the paper that comes with the hamster tubes actually will give you some good tips about putting the pieces together.
  • Start with smaller tube pieces and take your time.
  • Do not glue pieces together.

Cost

A set of hamster tubes can seem pretty inexpensive – they’re usually under $10. But if you start to put a lot of them together, the cost can start adding up. Start small and see how your hamster likes the tubes. Then you can start adding some on a little at a time.

See the Product page for more information.


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